Fungal Cell Structure

A fungal cell commonly exists in two forms like moulds and yeasts. Fungi are eukaryotic organisms possessing fruiting bodies or spores. Unlike plants, they lack chlorophyll. Moulds are the type of fungus that appears filamentous and multicellular in appearance. Conversely, yeasts are the fungus-like cells that include Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Sporobolomyces roseus, etc. and seem unicellular …

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Guard Cells in Plants

Guard cells appear bean-shaped. They are found in pairs, and a cleft between them constitute the stomatal pore or stoma. Therefore, two guard cells enclosing stomatal aperture colloquially form a structure called stomata. Guard cells reside in the layer of the leaf epidermis. Stomatal guard cells perform two functional roles like influx or efflux carbon …

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RBC Count Method

The RBC count method comes under haemocytometry, which quantitatively measures the number of RBCs in a blood sample. Haemocytometer or Neubauer’s chamber slide is a manual method to count RBCs. Nowadays, more accurate or automated devices have been developed like electrometric and photometric counter that can count the cell constituents of the blood sample. It …

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Diastase Enzyme

Diastase Enzyme was first discovered from the malt infusion. Anselme Payen and Jean Francois Persoz originally pioneered the existence of the diastase enzyme in the year 1833. Malt diastase, amylase etc., are the alternatives names for the diastase. It is used as a substitute for an enzyme (amylase). Malt, barley seeds, plants, milk, saliva etc., …

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