Science

Difference Between Unicellular and Multicellular Organisms

The difference between unicellular and multicellular organisms is primarily due to cell composition, function, and arrangement. Unicellular organisms exist as an individual cell, whereas multicellular organisms possess a group of specialized cells. Unicellular organisms mediate all their cellular activities by a single cell itself, while multicellular organisms perform specific cell activities through their specialized or …

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Difference Between Water-Soluble and Fat-Soluble Vitamins

The difference between water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins is primarily due to the difference in absorption and excretion rates inside a body. Water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins are the two major classes or groups of vitamins required to maintain good health. Absorption: Water-soluble vitamins are readily absorbed in the small intestine, while fat-soluble vitamins are first absorbed …

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Neurotransmitters

Neurotransmitters refer to the chemical messenger molecules, which contain amino acids, amines, purines and neuropeptides. Its activity may trigger or restrict nerve impulse production. Its synthesis occurs endogenously by the presynaptic neuron. Neurotransmitters release out upon membrane stimulation. They ensure neurotransmission by transmitting an action potential beyond the chemical synapse. Our nervous system uses neurotransmitters …

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Synapse

Synapse is a term pioneered by Charles S. Sherrington in 1897. It is derived from the Greek word “Synapsis”, which means to conjugate or clasp. The communication between the neurons is through synapses only, which facilitate nerve signal transmission from one to the next cell. A scientist named Sanford Palay observed the ultrastructure of neural …

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Nerve Impulse

Nerve impulse refers to the generation of action membrane potential beyond the cell membrane in response to the stimulus. “Nerve impulse conduction” refers to the propagation of nerve impulse that occurs due to a change in membrane potential beyond the cell membrane. When a nerve impulse or action potential reaches the axon terminal, synaptic transmission …

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Neurons

Neurons are the fundamental components of the nervous system that perform a specific task by receiving, conducting, and transmitting the signal or action potential to the other parts of the body. An electrical signal produced by the neurons is called a Nerve impulse that propagates via continuous and saltatory conduction. The term neuron is sometimes …

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Sclerenchyma Tissue

Sclerenchyma tissue refers to one of the types of ground or simple permanent tissues, which possesses both primary and stiff secondary wall. They exist as rigid woody cell with a compact arrangement. Sclerenchyma tissues aid cell integrity and conduction instead of being a dead cell. During the plant’s secondary, the sclerenchyma cells attain maturity and …

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Mitotic Division

Mitotic division shows a pattern of cell division, where a single cell multiplies into two similar daughter cells by the segregation of newly replicated chromosomes in the nucleus. It is the intermediate phase of the cell division that activates after the G-2 interphase and ends with cytokinesis. Mitosis is a part of the M-phase cell …

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